A Night of Words

WRITTEN BY: DELIA HOUSE-LOPEZ

A week ago, the power of spoken word moved many to tears of shared sorrow, joyful laughter and earnest thought as NCU held its second Poetry Slam. After successfully kicking off NCU’s first poetry slam last semester, Sam Koekkoek teamed up with Kairos, a club focused on creating art of every medium, to begin round two

Freshman Josh Higashi and now senior Sam Koekkoek hosted the event, and Josh began the night with the very first poem. After the initial mixture of snaps and applause resounded from the audience, a still quietness fell over the crowd, as if everyone knew how important this event would really be.

Student after student stood to share the art they had created; some made us chuckle quietly in content amusement, and others had us holding our breath so we wouldn’t miss the next word. We saw glimpses of professionally presented poems about feminism, tragedy, and love. We watched as our peers took their place at the front of the crowd one at a time, and surprised us with their words.

And it wasn’t just students who shared their stories with us; a couple members of the community were with us, as well as Keith Potter, a bible professor and the Executive Director of the Center for Leadership and Ethics here at NCU. they trusted us enough to share their own creations, and the student’s growing appreciation for them was nearly palpable from where I was sitting.

The night went on, and the stories told and the lessons taught only moved us further. It was a night I believe won’t be forgotten easily. I know that for me, it was especially important. Sam Koekkoek was the last to read one of his own pieces. To say that I was an emotional wreck afterwards would be an understatement, and I know that I’m not just speaking for myself.

If there’s one thing everyone who went to the Poetry Slam can agree on, it’s that last Tuesday was special.

Last Tuesday, we didn’t hide ourselves for once.

Last Tuesday, we proved that we could laugh, cry, listen, and accept.

Last Tuesday, we were vulnerable.

And oh, did we grow.